Wandering Vancouver in Autumn

Posted on 3rd October 2015 in architecture, explored, wandering

Lately I’ve been taking to the streets of Vancouver with my camera to photograph anything that I see. This is part my effort to begin studying what it means to be a documenter, and part my effort to learn the new camera I am using, the Sony Alpha7. It’s truly a remarkable camera and I have plans to do a full review of the camera shortly.

Vancouver is a city that I find incredibly beautiful, depending on the day. Some days, golden light shines through semi-tall buildings filled with multi-cultural citizens who spill out into the streets to enjoy the green city, some of them walking or cycling about their business.

Today was one of those days where the city is simply golden.

My path? I walked from Chinatown, to Gastown, to Granville St and Robson Street, back East through Yaletown, across the viaduct between Rogers Arena and BC Place Stadium, and back through Chinatown.

This is the architecture, graffiti and other nonsense I found along the way. Street Photography post can be found here.

Ned Tobin Vancouver Click here to read more.. »

Budapest, Hungary

Posted on 13th November 2014 in architecture, explored

Every new city or country that I go to I always make sure to get a map. Maps are a must-have as far as I’m concerned, but that may just be because I’m a map junkie. Just yesterday I had cause to look up Budapest again (I watched the movie Grand Budapest Hotel and was trying to find if I had walked close/where it existed in Budapest) and as per usual, I tried to remember the places I had been and the streets I had walked. As I was trying to remember, I realized that when I was in Budapest I had been treating SouthEast as North. I was almost 180 degrees backwards!

It’s all in how you look at a map.. To get an idea of where abouts I was roaming in Budapest, you can find the Liberty Statue, which is just above the cross photograph below overlooking the river and old town of Budapest here. I was staying around District III.

Funny that in my exploration/posts of cities from my trip through Europe in 2012 the next city up is Budapest.

Coming from places like Athens and Bucharest, Budapest seemed very clean and kempt. It’s really hard to judge cities when you compare them to North American buildings and streets. It’s an age thing I think. Everything seemed, to me, wise and old and beautiful. Buildings I know had seen wars and revolutions and kings and queens and knights and prosperity. Kind of like Brussels in a way, but Budapest felt most spread out though which could perhaps be accredited to the flatter terrain.

It was also in Budapest that my friend Gábor – whom I had met while in London – commissioned me to do a painting for him.

Budapest Architecture by Ned Tobin
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University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC

Posted on 1st May 2013 in architecture, explored

Behind my parents house in Prince George is a hill. At the top of that hill is UNBC, the University of Northern British Columbia. When I was a younger resident of PG this university was built, and has since become one of the more respected universities when talking about forestry schooling.

When I take the dog for walks, I like to head up the hill. Naturally as a photographer, I carry my camera with me. On a particularly nice afternoon I took some photographs!

I bet there aren’t too many universities in the world who can say they have regular bear, moose, and deer warnings.

I found particularly interesting the greenhouse. I wish I had gone inside to walk around and take photographs of the pretty flowers! Of all the things I saw, of all the beautiful wood detailing and modern architecture, I was most fascinated with the electrical car plugin center I found. Revolutionary!

University of Northern British Columbia architecture Administration Building

Administration Building

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Architecture of Riga | Part II

Posted on 19th March 2013 in architecture, wandering

Previously I’ve explored Part I of the architecture in Riga. In this part, I further explored the Ghetto, and some more of downtown Riga. The bridge you see is the main bridge of the city. I found it a beautiful bridge, and had to bike over it a few times on journeys. Happy memories for me there in Riga, I hope one day to return again.

I was going back to my place late one night as the sun set, and was heading over the bridge and caught the moon raising up between the towers in the town. The towers actually belong to the Riga Castle.

Just after those photographs are a wall that made me laugh every time I walked by it (multiple times a day). Most of the wall was perfect and arranged beautifully, then it came along these sections and it all just went to shit! Perhaps it was a new genious wall maker man who took over and did the abstract wall? Perhaps they got into the bottle? Perhaps they were angry at their wife? 🙂

Riga - 201209 (165 of 605) Click here to read more.. »

Architecture of Riga, Latvia | Part 1

Posted on 19th February 2013 in architecture, wandering

I have spent most of my life learning about my families history, or at least one branch of it. Those of you who don’t know me, I’m extremely fascinated with genealogy, and boast a family tree of over 2000 relatives. But, that’s a glory story for another day.

I had the opportunity to visit one of the most mentioned places in that part of my families history, Riga, Latvia, in the summer of 2012, and early fall. It was amazing because due to my family connections, I had many places to see, and was also invited to see many more.

I made two trips there. The first came as a half trip for the Mid-Summer festival I was invited to. Fun times. The second came at the end of my European tour, just after Stockholm, Sweden.

Riga is known around the world for boasting one of the most magnificent displays of Art Nouveau architecture, which I was so lucky to catch on a sunny evening walk. The final photograph is taken inside the Ghetto museum, which has the actual lampposts and cobblestone bricks that were transplanted from the ghetto of Riga, a few blocks away, to the museum. Just remembering the stories I read about it shake me to my very foundation.  This holocaust and WWII history is very tragic and not to be taken lightly, but if you’re interested to read more about it, wikipedia has a page on it.

This is Part I (find Part II here) of a II part exploration of the architecture in Riga.

Well, this is what I saw:

 

Riga - 062412 (6 of 20) Click here to read more.. »