A Plethora of Vancouver Urban Architecture

Posted on 3rd December 2015 in architecture, explored, wandering

Over the years I’ve gathered quite a large collection of photographs of Vancouver architecture. I’ve actually been having the recurring feeling that I take a lot of photographs as I look through my archives.

Vancouver is a fairly new city, compared to some of the other ancients found in most of the rest of the world. As a result, the buildings of Vancouver are an eclectic mix of various architectural building material and styles. Some built in the old European way, others built in modern glass and iron. At first glance, it could be a bit confusing. Once you start to know the neighborhoods though, you start to understand which ones are older. For example, Gastown is a very old district of Vancouver, but the neighboring Yaletown is a much newer part of town that mostly skyrocketed (literally) as a result of Expo ’86.

As one walks and looks closer, you can start to pick out heritage societies bright blue plaques that designate heritage buildings with a little bit more history about each building. Maybe stop next time and read what it says?

False Creek Vancouver

False Creek Vancouver

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Architecture of Stockholm, Sweden

Posted on 28th January 2015 in architecture

When I arrived in Stockholm in early September all I had was my flip-flops. I had worn holes in my shoes in Budapest and left them on the corner for some lucky soul in need of some red skate shoes.

When I got off the plane, it was cold. Then it rained. My first order of business was to find myself some leather soles.

I think it’s clear in the photographs how brisk the city was, which I really appreciated in it. It led to the clean feeling, the put together, well kempt style of the city. Further, the giant stone buildings, sculptures, and details all around the city made me feel like I was walking along Viking turf.

Nordic.

Stockholm, Sweden Click here to read more.. »

comments: 0 » tags: buildings, city, stockholm, sweden

Budapest, Hungary

Posted on 13th November 2014 in architecture, explored

Every new city or country that I go to I always make sure to get a map. Maps are a must-have as far as I’m concerned, but that may just be because I’m a map junkie. Just yesterday I had cause to look up Budapest again (I watched the movie Grand Budapest Hotel and was trying to find if I had walked close/where it existed in Budapest) and as per usual, I tried to remember the places I had been and the streets I had walked. As I was trying to remember, I realized that when I was in Budapest I had been treating SouthEast as North. I was almost 180 degrees backwards!

It’s all in how you look at a map.. To get an idea of where abouts I was roaming in Budapest, you can find the Liberty Statue, which is just above the cross photograph below overlooking the river and old town of Budapest here. I was staying around District III.

Funny that in my exploration/posts of cities from my trip through Europe in 2012 the next city up is Budapest.

Coming from places like Athens and Bucharest, Budapest seemed very clean and kempt. It’s really hard to judge cities when you compare them to North American buildings and streets. It’s an age thing I think. Everything seemed, to me, wise and old and beautiful. Buildings I know had seen wars and revolutions and kings and queens and knights and prosperity. Kind of like Brussels in a way, but Budapest felt most spread out though which could perhaps be accredited to the flatter terrain.

It was also in Budapest that my friend Gábor – whom I had met while in London – commissioned me to do a painting for him.

Budapest Architecture by Ned Tobin
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Architecture of Bucharest, Romania

Posted on 7th August 2013 in architecture

In the late summer of 2012 I traveled to Bucharest, Romania to experience Eastern European culture at its finest. I learned many things about the culture while there. One part of the culture I was very interested in and to learn about was the Gypsys. I spent some time wandering through Gypsy prominent area, which happened to be right next to where I was staying. I learned that Gypsys didn’t come from Romania, they came from India. But, in the nature of a Gypsy, they don’t really have a home land, they are rather nomadic people.

The place I was staying in was the only room in a artist collective, where about 4 artists shared the spot. The apartment was located very close to a very big Gypsy market, where I got my produce that I survived on. It was a very interesting part of town I was in, for I was able to walk to the Old Town very quickly. Old Town is famous for it’s Parisian culture, and is so named Little Paris. Apparently when Bucharest was thriving – I suspect in the late 19th century – architects went to learn their skills in Paris, after which they returned home to build.

What I found most notable about the whole journey was the contrasting states of decay everywhere. One building would be a fancy embassy with a well kept garden, and the building beside it would be completely decayed and abandoned. I always suspect long forgotten Counts or Barons to have been the previous owners of the buildings… I wonder how many times I’m right?

This is what I saw when wandering.

Bucharest - 29082012 (237 of 361) Click here to read more.. »

Architecture of San Francisco, California

Posted on 24th July 2013 in architecture

It was over a year ago now that I made my trip down to San Francisco. I took the most western route possible the whole way down, stopping at every spot I could along the coast. I have also already shown the images of the people, the street photography I did while down there (part 1, part 2). Now, I want to show you the architecture I photographed down there.

I was staying in Lower Knob Hill, and spent a lot of time around that area, wandering to the business district, china town, all along the piers, Market, Little Saigon, and Fillmore district. I walked a lot, and took a lot of photos! Met some very cool people too, as usual.

San Francisco - 201202 (136 of 809) Click here to read more.. »