Vancouver Burlesque Centre’s 1 Year Anniversary

Posted on 17th October 2012 in events

I regularly photograph the very talented Lola Frost [see painting her, the park, whiskey tracks, and dance studio among others]. As a result I think she’s starting to like me. So, she invited me to the 1st year anniversary of the dance studio she co-owns with Cherry On-Top and Burgundy Brixx called Vancouver Burlesque Centre. This was a very proud moment for the women and a very fun night for all who attended with performances by some of their selected students!

If your so inclined to get into one of their classes, they have a schedule with everything they’re up to.

The event really felt like a family event, everybody was just happy to have made it that far and to be part of such a tantalizing environment within Vancouver. They have every right to be proud!

This is what I saw.

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Dance Studio with Lola Frost

Posted on 26th January 2012 in After Dark

Last weekend was busy. I had a fashion/style shoot with Christine Anne, as well I headed to Whistler to capture snowy trees. Both awesome, both a success.

To continue my creativity, I did this shoot.  Lola (@LolaFrost) is full of energy, charismatic, and ready to put her body in the most glorious of positions to create something very surreal. I like working with Lola (we did a shoot a few weeks ago as well); she is fun, and challenges me to match her own awesomeness and fast pace. She moves a lot. With the low lighting situations I usually have to pull the camera shutter pretty slow,  so this also amplifies the challenge!

Who is  Lola Frost ? Well, she is a “Rock’N’Roll Flapper, Burlesque Performer, Bad Ass Dance Instructor, Ninja, Make Out Artist, Sass Master, Rebel with a Cause. Director of Vancouver Burlesque Centre.” In essence, she rocks.

For this shoot I used a Canon EFS 18-55mm lens with a T1i body, and a Yongnuo flash to help bring a bit of light into the shots. I chose this particular lens because it offered me the ability to shoot the close up shots, and also get her full body in the photograph (this much should be obvious) since the space I had to stand back from Lola for some of the angles I wanted were fairly limited.

Using one flash, with such low lighting conditions, was pretty hard; it would throw huge shadows on the background. What I ended up doing was relying mostly on the overhead studio lighting. They were dimmer pot lights, that we used as a spot light. I also turned the flash down to about 1/64 or 1/32 power for most of the shots to add just a little bit of lighting onto some of the shots. It worked out pretty good, but I would have loved to have a diffuser on the flash.

Do you have any ideas I could try to help pop a bit of the model just enough but still keep the darkness to the photographs?

 

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