Forests for the World, Prince George, BC

Posted on 22nd May 2016 in adventure, nature, wandering

In Prince George, there is a region of forests they’ve dedicatedly labelled: Forests for the World. I’ve linked there to the Tourism PG‘s website that explains it fairly effectively.

When I was living last in Prince George, out our back door were trails that led me through this land, or more technically, to this land. On days I was feeling particularly ambitious, I would hike all the way up past the University of Northern British Columbia to the officially designated trail system.

In the news the other day, a man was attacked by a black bear along these trails, and survived because of his valiant dog! And it’s true, there are animals a plenty there. I remember one morning taking my dog, Angus,¬†for a walk and we had an interesting encounter. There is a stretch along a path where there’s a big culvert separating two trails that go parallel. One the one path I walked, and on the other path was a mother moose and her little calf! I was happy it was blistering cold and by this time both Angus and I were b-lining it home as silently and quickly as possible. We would some mornings wake up and see that our composting buckets had been upturned by a bear at some point in the night. I remember one day my father and I cleaning muddy bear paw marks off the fence he had just built!

For this hike, I had a German Couchsurfer staying with me, and I took her up to see what the wilderness of Prince George, Northern BC was like.

A walk through Forests for the World by Ned Tobin in Prince George British Columbia Canada

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North! To Prince George

Posted on 11th March 2016 in adventure, nature, wandering

I grew up in Prince George, BC. I’ve always described it as the place smack dab in the middle of BC, though it’s the capital of Northern BC. On a map, it’s pretty perfectly in the center. Driving, it’s about 10 hours north of Vancouver.

Driving from Vancouver one first finds the Fraser Valley, then abruptly turn norther into the winding Fraser Canyon that turns into the North Thompson canyon and then connects back up to the Fraser River to follow it more or less all the way up through the Cariboo to the Central Interior and Prince George. On the way back South, we hooked West at Cache Creek to wind our way through to Pemberton and Whistler before getting back to Vancouver.

In the winter the scenery is brown and muddy and very snowy and icy the further north one goes. In the fall you can expect to find every color of the rainbow in the trees that occupy the landscape that spins by. In the spring and summer everything is green and growing and each of the little lakes and creeks along the way call out, inviting you to jump on in.

Being so long of a drive, and one that I’ve done countless times in my life, I’m usually trying to avoid stopping, rather then stopping to take photographs of anything that catches my eye.

Having a foreign friend – Nene – with me, I took all the back roads and detours I knew! She was all smiles, and “ooh” and “ahhh”. Great travel companion!

20151113 - North BC Fraser Canyon Pemberton - Ned Tobin - 6

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Spring in Prince George, BC, Canada

Posted on 10th May 2015 in adventure, nature

Those of us living in rainforests are fairly used to all year round green grass and tulips, but most of the rest of Canada and the northern hemisphere are just losing the last of their snow and preparing for the first blossoms to spring up. It’s spring after all!

These photographs were taken in Prince George, BC, in the middle of spring: early May (spring begins ~ March 20th). I used to walk these trails every single morning and listen to the birds as they’d sing me awake.

Spring in Prince George, BC, Canada Click here to read more.. »

Gallery of Landscapes

Posted on 12th January 2015 in adventure, explored, nature, wandering

Why not cure this severe wanderlust with a collection of landscapes I’ve shot from 2012 to 2014… That’ll do the trick, right?

Many of these photographs have had a whole fotoblog dedicated to them. If you do a search on the left you should be able to find more about the location. Some of these I haven’t released until now.

Please don’t hesitate to ask questions about any of the journeys in the comments below or email me. I love to share stories.

Oregon Coast, USA

Oregon Coast, USA

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The Ancient Forest, Prince George, BC

Posted on 15th February 2014 in adventure, explored, nature, wandering

Prince George, British Columbia has a very rare and unique forest known as the Interior Wetbelt, which is the worlds only known rainforest so far from the ocean, about 800 kms away. The wet biogeoclimatic zones associated with the inland rainforest cover more than 110,000 ha in the upper Fraser River valley. Stands that contain ancient Western Redcedars (Thuja plicata) and associated biodiversity are quite limited in their distribution within the upper Fraser River valley, particularly because of the logging in the region.

I did this hike last year in mid October, 2013 with my brothers, and it was colder than expected. I was happy I had brought mittens and a tuque, but the hiking around gets you warm pretty quick. If you’re a snowshoe’r, this trail is open 365 days a year and I believe there are also tours that head out frequently.

This region is unique because it’s sandwiched in between the Rocky Mountains (to the East) and the Coastal Mountains (to the West). The Ancient Forest has ancient cedar trees and ferns that have been undisturbed for centuries. Many individual trees are estimated to be over one thousand years in age.

Antique Forest stands are typically located in wet toe-slope or bench topographic positions, often in close proximity to the valley sides. However, given the easy access afforded by Highway 16 and the exceptional stature of trees in these stands, most of the toe-slope Antique Forest stands along the highway corridor in this area have been logged over the last half century. Consequently opportunities to view this exceptional feature of B.C.’s inland rainforest are now limited.

To learn more about the wetbelt, the Ancient Forest, UNBC has a great page dedicated to explaining it, which I’ve used as reference for this writeup.

Oh, and there’s an exceptionally large tree in there they’ve dubbed Treebeard, after the Hobbit or Lord of the Rings chronicles.

2013.10.12 - Ancient Forest (2 of 189) Click here to read more.. »