Spring on the Farm

Posted on 28th June 2022 in adventure, animals, foto story, nature, photojournalism, Red Spruce

Today it’s nearly the beginning of July. The summer solstice has passed and it’s shorter days from here on forth for another half year. On the farm here, we have a litter of piglets nearly ready for weaning, our first calf of the year was born a few days ago, Rosie our Great Pyrenees dog is about to give birth, lambs are almost all at the target weight of 90 lbs, and the grass is ready to cut if only we had a few days in a row of sunny, dry, and windy weather for the hay!

I’m definitely starting to feel more like a farmer. I think we all are here. We have chores that definitely involve animals. We have learned a great deal about fencing and the importance of it to keep the animals where you want them to be and safe. I watch the weather religiously and keep an eye on animals for any symptoms of something wrong. I also sweat through my shirt on the regular and enjoy a cold beer on the patio at the end of a day.

It’s been quite a test of my devotion to photographs these last few years as I learn to re-integrate the camera into my arsenal. Most days I’m covered in something that I don’t want to get on the camera. This means carrying a camera has been a challenge for me. It’s also a challenge carrying all the things I like to keep on me, my every day carry stuff. As of right now, I have started to put everything into a ruksack that I take with me everywhere. Inside there is my Lowepro camera bag keeping my camera behind a second wall of defense. It seems to be working, but also quite heavy! But I use it like one would a jacket: I take it to where I’m working and hang it on some hook I can find and then go about my work.

Perhaps these photos will show some of what we’ve been up to where my words cannot elaborate.

Highland Cows - Red Spruce Farm
Shawna our Highland cow with her new calf
North Country Cheviots in Upper Right Orchard - Red Spruce Farm
North Country Cheviots in the Upper Right Orchard
Daisy
Daisy
Shawna a highland cow
Shawna, one of our highland cows, being curious
Highland bull
our young Highland bull
Fresh lambs
Fresh lambs
A lamb getting a feeding
A lamb getting a feeding
North Country Cheviot lamb
North Country Cheviot lamb
Two North Country Cheviot lambs
Two North Country Cheviot lambs
Rosie and Gunder playing
Rosie and Gunder playing
A lamb on top of her mother
A lamb who has learned the view is better ontop of her mother
Lambs
Lambs who made friends
Two lambs
Two lambs caught in the sunlight
Ewe and her lamb
Ewe and her lamb
Two lambs
Two lambs enjoying the warmth of the sun
Rosie
Rosie guarding the barn
Charring fence posts as a method of preserving
Charring fence posts as a method of preserving, an old Japanese method called Yakisugi. It is supposed to keep the logs in the ground just as long if not longer than pressure treated posts. Time will tell.
swallows
Swallows have returned. They do make a mess of the siding, but come fall the rain washes it all off.
Gunder
Gunder, one of our Great Pyrenees livestock guardian dogs, still a puppy
Bottle feeding lambs
Dad with our multi-lamb bottle feeding lambs
Highland Cows
Highland Cows
Shawna one of our highland cow
Shawna and her bull calf from 2021
North Country Cheviot ram and boer buck
Howie, our North Country Cheviot ram and Mahone, our boer buck. Best friends both anxious to meet their ladies for the year.
7 New Piglets
7 new Berkshire Piglets
Fresh baton on the barn
Fresh baton on the barn
Gunder
Gunder, our young livestock guardian Great Pyrenees growing so quickly.
Pogo
Pogo, our Great Pyrenees sire and livestock guardian dog
The grass is almost ready for making hay!
Some say weeds, I say variety and biodiversity
Rosie
Rosie, our Great Pyrenees dam
Guinea fowl in a standoff with Maggie the cat
Guinea fowl in a standoff with Maggie the kitten
Meadow buttercup
Meadow buttercup
North Country Cheviot ewes with their lambs out on pasture
North Country Cheviot ewes with their lambs coming in from pasture
Hops
Newly transplanted hops survived!
Bart the shepherd
Bart the shepherd
Luna on disc harrows
Luna on disc harrows
Our Berkshire sow and her daughter
Our Berkshire sow (right) ready to birth and her daughter, a durok cross.
Grazing north country cheviot sheep before the fence posts were put in
Grazing North Country Cheviot sheep before the fence posts were put in
Newly pounded fence posts
Newly pounded fence posts
Luna the cat on a shelf in the barn
Luna the cat on a shelf in the barn
Freshly welded disc harrows
Freshly welded disc harrows
1 week old guinea keets
1 week old guinea keets
Berkshire piglets with her mother eating
Berkshire piglets with her mother eating
Berkshire Piglets at Red Spruce Farm
A scared Berkshire piglet by her shelter
Berkshire Piglets at Red Spruce Farm
Berkshire Piglets

6 Responses to “Spring on the Farm”

  1. Lorraine says:

    Lovely pictures thanks for sharing. Missing you lot! Say hi to everyone for me. Hoping to be able to visit again someday soon!

  2. Sheila B Daley says:

    Thanks for sharing Ned. Its certainly a busy time for farmers these days but its a great life.

    • ned says:

      Happy you took a moment to have a look, Sheila. Hard to imagine it was all hay fields a few short years ago, isn’t it?

  3. Cyril says:

    Yes, the pics do tell a story. Thanks for the documentary on the growth and development

    • ned says:

      Us Tobin’s sure do try to talk the story out though! Don’t we? It’s nice to be able to share with you from afar, though it sure would be easier if you came for a visit!

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